Programme

Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


  • Between Aspiration and Reality: Cultural Conflict in a University Classroom
    Between Aspiration and Reality: Cultural Conflict in a University Classroom
    Keynote Presentation: Haruko Satoh
  • Education and Displaced People
    Education and Displaced People
    Keynote Panel Presentation: Yozo Yokota, Sachiko Ishikawa & Haruko Satoh
  • Independence and Interdependence: Educational Cooperation Across Borders
    Independence and Interdependence: Educational Cooperation Across Borders
    Featured Panel Presentation: Justin Sanders

Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACEID conferences via the links below.

Between Aspiration and Reality: Cultural Conflict in a University Classroom
Keynote Presentation: Haruko Satoh

Internationalisation is the buzzword in Japanese universities, and the pressure to increase the number of international students is high. Yet, aside from the problem of offering courses in English, which is a challenge in itself, what appears overlooked is the issue of handling cultural and religious differences among students. Neither the faculty nor university staff members are equipped adequately to handle the problems that arise among students who come from vastly different backgrounds (ethnicity, culture, religion as well as the political situation in the home countries) with different expectations for coming to Japan to study. A high cultural context country like Japan creates a classroom where not only there is a fault line between Japanese and international students, but also between international students, leaving little room for common ground to buffer, address, mediate and reconcile what can only be described as screams of irreconcilable differences. The situation, unless addressed squarely, may have disastrous implications on the Japanese government’s future immigration policy. This presentation is based on a personal experience of teaching classes that are comprised of students from wide range of countries to flesh out the challenges to encouraging multi- and inter-cultural conversation and awareness in Japan.

Read presenter biographies.

Education and Displaced People
Keynote Panel Presentation: Yozo Yokota, Sachiko Ishikawa & Haruko Satoh

According to the United Nations, there are almost 70 million forcibly displaced people in the world today. People can become displaced for many reasons; fleeing war or persecution, because climate change or natural disasters have left their homes uninhabitable, because of a breakdown in social order, or for any number of other reasons. The needs to be addressed in helping people who have been driven from their homes, whatever the cause, include, among other things, basic protection, food and shelter, healthcare and education. The challenges are, as seen in the refugee crisis in Europe, political, social, economic as well as cultural. Furthermore, the plight of the Rohingyas has highlighted the hitherto sidestepped systemic challenge of providing the same help for the stateless, who are differentiated from refugees and denied access to many of the basic services and opportunities of hosting countries solely on the basis of their status not recognised legally anywhere.

This Plenary Panel will discuss the ways in which education needs can be addressed, with a focus on the potential and challenges for Japanese schools and universities to get involved. One issue to be discussed is the Japan International Cooperation Agency’s (JICA) programme, titled the Japanese Initiative for the future of Syrian Refugees (JISR), a scholarship scheme allowing displaced Syrian students to study in Japan. In addition to discussing the implementation of scholarship programmes, the panel will also discuss the other needs of displaced students who come to Japan, including access to healthcare and mental health resources, food and shelter, and also dealing with the challenges of cultural diversity and language barriers.

Read presenter biographies.

Independence and Interdependence: Educational Cooperation Across Borders
Featured Panel Presentation: Justin Sanders

Partnerships are increasingly becoming a defining feature of higher education endeavours in the 21st century. In recent years, most high-impact research is the result of international collaboration, and universities from all regions are showing greater commitment to working together to address global issues. One of the most interesting aspects of this increased collaboration is cross-border partnerships to develop and offer educational programmes. Such programmes often blend curriculum and content from one provider with approach and pedagogy from another. At times, partners work together to create entirely new educational models apart from what existed in either context. This panel of higher education scholars and practitioners seeks to explore the growth of educational partnerships and their implications. It also seeks to highlight successful models as well as common pitfalls and challenges. The aim is to provide a rich and engaging discussion on how higher education institutions can work together to advance the delivery of education while making local offerings more relevant to the needs of the 21st century global society.

The scope of this panel will consider such initiatives as international partnerships, and branch campuses, particularly in the context of developing countries; university cooperation on research to address global issues (i.e. SDGs), and increasing partnerships in the delivery of education, such as dual degrees. Panelists will specifically focus on the Asian context.

Read presenter biographies.